Tag Archives: sugar

New Nutrition Labels: 5 Important Changes

Finally, the FDA is catching up with reality. And Michelle Obama is one of the people you can thank for this beneficial change.

By mid-2018, all packaged foods will be required to contain the updated Nutrition Facts labels. There are many changes, including larger type for calories, number of servings, and serving size, as well as a new category—added sugars. Michelle Obama, who has focused her First Lady efforts on promoting healthier lifestyles, first proposed updating the label 2 years ago.

Packaged foods have listed key ingredients and other information on standardized nutrition labels since 1994 under a mandate from the Food and Drug Administration. The nutrition label has not been updated in more than 20 years, despite the change in food consumption patterns.

Serving size has substantially increased. For example, a single soda serving was previously calculated at 8 ounces and a single ice cream serving was ½ cup. For the new label, those serving sizes have been reformulated to reflect what people are actually consuming—12 ounces for soda and 2/3 cup for ice cream. These updated calculations increase both the per serving calorie count as well as the cost/serving.

Most Prominent Changes

  1. Much Larger Type

A much larger type at the top of the label highlights calories, serving size and servings per package

nutrition

Continue reading New Nutrition Labels: 5 Important Changes

New Fed Dietary Guidelines Ignore WHO and Scientific Advisors

Every 5 years, the USDA and HHS together release an updated Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). Legislated in 1990 under the National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Act, the report contains nutritional and dietary information and guidelines for the general public.

The 2015-2020 Guidelines 

  1. Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan. All food and beverage choices matter. Choose a healthy eating pattern at an appropriate calorie level to help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight, support nutrient adequacy, and reduce the risk of chronic disease.
  2. Focus on variety, nutrient density, and amount. To meet nutrient needs within calorie limits, choose a variety of nutrient-dense foods across and within all food groups in recommended amounts.
  3. Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake. Consume an eating pattern low in added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium. Cut back on foods and beverages higher in these components to amounts that fit within healthy eating patterns.
  4. Shift to healthier food and beverage choices. Choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages across and within all food groups in place of less healthy choices. Consider cultural and personal preferences to make these shifts easier to accomplish and maintain.
  5. Support healthy eating patterns for all. Everyone has a role in helping to create and support healthy eating patterns in multiple settings nationwide, from home to school to work to communities. 

What’s Changed 

Unlike earlier releases of the Dietary Guidelines, which focused on Continue reading New Fed Dietary Guidelines Ignore WHO and Scientific Advisors